The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World - World of Angus

The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World

We've all heard the statistics and debunked myths of "dangerous breeds," but do you know which dogs are actually the most dangerous?

We're here to shed some light on the five most dangerous types of dogs in the world.

The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World 

1. The Untrained Dog

Possibly the most dangerous of them all is the untrained dog. An untrained dog has no rules or guidelines. Therefore, they also have no understanding of "right" and "wrong."

A dog without proper training is the most capable of causing accidental, or purposeful harm to a human being or another animal, based on the fact that they are usually lacking in impulse control. These impulses can lead to fights with other dogs, aggression towards humans, or attacks on other house-hold animals. 

Though these behavioral issues can be tough to manage, it is never too late to start training. If you have, or know someone who has an untrained dog, we suggest you seek professional help to prevent any future incidents. 

The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World

2. The Fearful Dog

A fearful dog, or dog experiencing anxiety, can be incredibly dangerous. Any animal with fear aggression must be handled with extreme care. Even if the dog has no previous history of fear aggression, you should always take every step to ensure that your safety is top priority.

Fearful dogs may lash out in an attempt to protect themselves, even if the situation doesn't seem dangerous to you. If a dog is expressing signs of anxiety or fear, proceed with caution, and do what you can to make the dog more comfortable. 

Sometimes human contact can be the source of the fear, and it may be best to leave the dog alone. 

Remember, they are terrified and only trying to protect themselves.  

The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World

3. The Unpredictable Dog

Unpredictable dogs are a huge risk to animals and humans. Most people don't take the danger of unpredictable dogs seriously until an incident occurs. 

If you have reason to believe that a dog is unpredictable, be mindful of their interactions with others. Unpredictable dogs should be monitored at all times, and kept away from dogs with aggression or possession issues to prevent incidents. 

Your safety is also important. Exercise caution with dogs you don't trust. 

The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World 

4. The Tired or Sick Dog

If you've ever been sick or physically exhausted, you understand how frustrating it is to be pestered. It's often forgotten that dogs have feelings too, and can become cranky or upset when tired. 

Dogs don't have many ways to verbally communicate with humans. This is why "snapping" is more commonly experienced when dealing with sleeping dogs. Snapping is a warning sign, but can cause injury if mouth to skin contact is made. 

If your dog is tired or not feeling well, leave him alone. And be sure to keep small children away from him until he is fully awake and aware. 

The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World

5. The Unfamiliar Dog 

This one is most commonly forgotten, but also the most important. 

If a dog isn't familiar with you, he will probably be uncomfortable at first. Some dogs take longer to warm up to people than others, and their personal space must be respected. Dogs have bubbles too. 

If your first reaction is to grab a strange dog by the face and squish it, you're asking for a bite.  

Always let a dog come to you first, no matter how long it takes.

A comfortable dog is a happy dog.

The Five Most Dangerous Types Of Dogs In The World 

Angus Off-Leash


Alyssa Castle
Alyssa Castle

Author

Alyssa Lynn Castle is a certified crazy dog lady, who spends most of her days exploring with her two fur kids. She is a bully breed advocate, and a firm believer in the phrase "Adopt! Don't Shop." You can check out photos of her adorable pups and their adventures on their Instagram account @mortthepitbull



17 Responses

Charles Brotman
Charles Brotman

June 08, 2016

PS. Neglected to mention it in my earlier post, but thanks for a good article and discussion, knowledge and insights

Charles Brotman
Charles Brotman

June 07, 2016

I have never owned a “Pit” But I have great respect for them. i own a 15 pound Maltese . She is a sweet submissive and generally kind and calm dog, But I never let her interact with young children without my direct supervision. She has never bitten an adult, but she has snapped at kids when they ignore my instructions to not hug her (that really bugs her when the tiny tots do it. she is fairly well trained and socialized, but I still don’t trust her alone with ther little ones! My point? If i’m not paying attention and a child gets in her face she MIGHT snap at them, but I don’t think she’s likely to do much damaging unless some freak accident happens. The larger dog with greater bite strength would be an “amplified” vesion of my dog!. Any transgression would likely be much more serious ( I’m not saying that there’s a greater risk — I agree that that is dependent on the individual dog and its owner, —Just that the potential damage is greater. Ergo, it’s especially important that the trainer of a large-breed or especially strong-jawed dog be that much better a trainer and keep a better watch over their more powerful, though not necessarily more aggressive pet.

Sharron
Sharron

May 29, 2016

I have had several dogs over the years all but one was a rescue. I have had both pitbulls (both calm and gentle and lazy) and small breeds such as a shitzu and a maltese. I have only been bitten once and that was by a dog that was not my own in a vet’s office because her owner was not paying attention to her and apparently she had done it before.

However I am very aware of nervous dogs (I have one now and when we walk together I always muzzle her because she is unpredictable and very nervous. My shitzu on the other hand is very calm and relaxed around dogs and other people.

So I have to agree it depends not only on training but on the owner as well.

Sharron

Alyssa Castle
Alyssa Castle

April 11, 2016

Hello!

I wanted to thank everyone for their comments, and for sharing this article. You have all sparked some interesting conversations!

The message behind this article is that every dog, no matter the breed, has the opportunity to be a well-behaved animal. It is up to the owners to raise the dog with love, care, and proper training.

Feel free to leave more comments and discuss further. We love hearing your opinions :)

-Alyssa Castle

Cheryl Huerta
Cheryl Huerta

April 05, 2016

Martina Bullock thank you so much for sharing your personal experience. As a pit bull advocate some might be amazed just how many stories I’ve been told about people such as yourself who chose to base their beliefs about these dogs on the news media and the anti-pit bull campaigners but who had an occasion to meet and get to know one and was completely and totally won over. It is so very sad that the vast majority of people who jump on the anti-pit bull propaganda bus very likely have never even seen a live pit bull type dog let alone ever been near one or have interacted with one. I know for a fact that IF any of these people had ever had the privilege of knowing a well-behaved, well-socialized and well-handled pit bull type dog they would no longer choose to believe the things that some posting here apparently believe.

Personal experience will trump propaganda every time and you are living proof. Good on you for keeping an open mind and allowing your Wally to come into your home and your heart.

Ric Silver
Ric Silver

April 04, 2016

I raised Kerry Blue Terriers for 18 years and was shocked to learn they had been put on a list of dangerous dogs – In all my years with the breed, I only met one that was “dangerous” – and it was a fault of the owner and breeder – and poor bloodlines. If they grow up in a loving home and are taken care of correctly – they are one of the most beautiful breeds in dogdom.

Martina Bullock
Martina Bullock

April 03, 2016

this is all really sad to me…. I can not believe there are still people so ignorant about believing aggressive behavior is a dogs fault. I used to believe this crap about bully breeds because that’s all you ever heard on the news. Well, let me tell you….I have owned and been around a lot of dogs in my live which I dearly loved. One day my daughter, who did not live with us at that time, decided to adopt a little puppy at the pound and I was not happy with her because he happened to be a pit mix. I was still one of those ignorant stupid people that based my feelings about this breed based on all the bad stuff I have heard. She ended up moving back and so did her puppy. Well, let me tell you…..this little guy stole our heart. We ended up begging her to leave him with us when she decided to move out. He is the best dog I have ever been around. His name is Wally.Words can not express the relation ship we have with him. He is beautiful and when people ask what kind of dog he is we just say he is our ’’WALLY" dog. He is a very special kind of dog to us.He is our best friend. The only bad thing about owning him is that it makes me sad to think about him one day not being around. IF YOU LOVE YOUR DOGS THEY WILL LOVE YOU!! I truly believe that it is us humans that control their behavior. Shame on all people that allow these poor animals to get a bad rep. It is our responsibility to teach rules and boundaries.

darren
darren

April 02, 2016

the hyena has the most powerfull bite with 4000 pounds of down pressure next is the staffishire pittbull with 2300 pounds of down pressure

Ray morta
Ray morta

April 01, 2016

The most dangereous dog are pittbull and rotweiller they have more fatal than any other dog

judge
judge

March 31, 2016

staffies and or pits where the preferred family dog right up until the 50’s early 60’sI had never ran across a bad one till some hoodlums moved in the block in 2010 and had 2 that where trained to be vicious, the dogs were removed after they attacked other dogs in the neighborhood,Luckily they went to a rescue, and my understanding is they are very good pets now.

natasha
natasha

March 31, 2016

We have eight dogs, and they are all trained and adored, however because of issues with little children, the little ladies do snap when the kiddies irritate them. Our one dog taught my cousins sine how to walk as she was told he wouldn’t. Today he runs and plays with the dogs

Judith
Judith

March 29, 2016

I have a Great Dane x Irish wolfhound, she is very large but very good natured , she has been attacked while out walking by a jack Russell and a large cat, both did a lot of damage, the small dog tore open my girls shoulder , the owner gave me the evils as if it was my fault and never said a word , I was so shocked and so concerned for my dog , I said nothing either , just because the dog is large, doesn’t mean it is aggressive, it’s more likely to be the other way round , but I agree that owners should take responsibility and get some good training and set boundaries

Amanda
Amanda

March 29, 2016

I have a pure bred English staffy who is the most sweetest gentle natured dog who is great with my 4 kids all under 7 and the dog is so affectionate to them and wouldn’t hurt a fly. It is the owners treatment of them which makes dogs dangerous or not

Mariannchampion
Mariannchampion

March 28, 2016

Good info. ???

Cheryl Fluckiger
Cheryl Fluckiger

March 28, 2016

My former neighbor nearly hemorrhaged one night when her unsocialized, extremely fearful, untrained toy poodle bit her and hit a large blood vessel. That dog bit everyone! I don’t care what dog it is, there is ALWAYS a warning when a dog is about to bite. It may be subtle, but the warning is always there.

Bev
Bev

March 26, 2016

the most dangerous dog, is the one that is treated badly,

Sue Putt
Sue Putt

March 25, 2016

I am editor of our Regional newsletter and would like to share this excellent article in our newsletter. May I have your permission to reprint it? Thanks!

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