8 Things People Don't Realize About Having A Bully Breed - World of Angus

8 Things People Don't Realize About Having A Bully Breed

Every type of dog comes with its own set of guidelines, perks, and challenges, but bully breeds are one of the most misunderstood, with many misconceptions and myths surrounding them. We want to dispel some myths and let people know these 8 things that most don't realize about owning a bully breed.

Pit Bulls are loyal dogs

1. They are super loyal and need lots of love

Bully breeds (of which there are many!) love people and tend to form a very strong and close bond with their owners, which mean they are not a “set-it-and-forget-it” bunch. They do not do well left alone in an enclosure or in the back yard. Instead, they need at least a couple hours a day of your undivided time, love, and attention. In return for this they will be fiercely loyal to you and the other members of your family. They really love to cuddle after a nice walk and once you have earned their respect and love they will do anything to please you and win your favour.

2. They are social butterflies

Bullies don’t really deserve their reputation as fierce guard dogs. If they are socialized correctly (and not taught to be aggressive, as many who buy them solely to be a “guard dog” do), they are very trusting of strangers and love making new human friends.

3. Bullies have a great temperament but need supervision around other dogs.

Not many people know that bullies often beat out breeds with better reputations (like golden retrievers and collies) in temperament tests done by The American Temperament Testing Society (ATTS). They do need careful socializing when it comes to other dogs, however, as they do have a history of being less tolerant with them. If you decide to adopt one it’s important to carefully observe your dog in all social situations and use caution in accordance to how accepting they are of other animals. In some cases this might mean doggy playdates instead of letting them free in the dog park, where it's easy for any dog to get carried away. 

Bully dogs

4. They are very active

Bullies were bred to be muscular, high energy, athletic dogs, and thus, need a lot of exercise. They tend to be very good at agility training and other sports, and do better with a minimum of 30 minutes of outdoor activity a day. This means they work well for people who have an active lifestyle, rather than those who prefer a slower pace. In many places laws prohibit letting bullies off leash, so a yard, a dog run, or even an indoor treadmill can be a great option, and failing that a good walk or jog with you.

5. Bullies are great with kids

Bully dogs that are socialized correctly are very nurturing, caring, and playful with children. As with all dogs, children should not be allowed to pull the dog’s ears and tails or left totally unsupervised with them, as this always has the potential to lead to aggression on the part of the annoyed dog, no matter the breed. However, bullies love all humans, and are highly intelligent, so with the proper training (for the dog and the human!) they can be fantastic family dogs.

6. Certain areas have Bully breed-specific laws

Because Bullies were originally bred to be fighting dogs, people who are looking for an aggressive guard-dog will often choose a bully and purposefully train it to be hostile. This mixture of irresponsible dog owners, coupled with the public myths and fears that surround many bully breeds has resulted in laws that apply only to them, and change depending on where you live. Some areas have banned them altogether, while some have regulations surrounding ownership of specific breeds, such as mandatory muzzling in public, microchipping, and having liability insurance. Sometimes homeowner’s insurance might have an exclusion on certain breeds, and sometimes condos or apartment buildings may not permit them, even when other breeds are allowed. Make sure to ask the shelter you adopt from about any laws, and when if you move, check up on the laws in your new city and if you rent, your building as well.

Bully breeds are awesome

7. It might take a little more work to adopt a Bully

Because there are so many irresponsible pet owners, especially when it comes to bullies, it may be a bit more challenging to adopt them than other types of dogs. A good shelter will have a rigorous screening process, and it is important to not take it personally if they question your reasoning for wanting a bully. The shelter will probably request references, give you a detailed application form/questionnaire, and do a home visit to ensure you are a responsible and kind owner.

8. Bullies have strong genes

Bullies tend to have few health concerns, and since they are so energetic and active they are usually quite fit. They also have shorter hair, so they don’t require a ton of grooming and their shedding won’t be as pronounced as longer haired dogs. One of their few issues is a tendency toward joint problems, but this can be warded off by walks on softer ground (grass and earth instead of pavement), and by warming them up with a shorter walk before allowing them to do more strenuous activities.

References

1. AOL


Callianne Bachman
Callianne Bachman

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